2010 Full Events

Read the Schmedule page to see when these peeps hit the stage/street/gallery/room thing.

FEATURED

Felix Kubin

David Kestenbaum (from NPR’s Planet Money)

Lucky Dragons

BUILD

Atari Punk Consoles – Justin Sabe

Contact Mic Making – Ed Bear & Dan Fishkin

DIY Transmitter – Brett Ian Balogh

CREATE

B’more Soundwalk & Improv Workshop – Bonnie Jones & Suzanne Thorpe

Book Odds REMIX – Roman Mars

Documentary Square Dance – The Place + Memory Project

Exquisite Puppies: An Interactive Experiment – Dennis Conrow & Jesse Dukes

From the Ground Up: Making Music with Free Software – Patrick McNameeKing

Group Interactive Biofeedback Performance – Eric Lindley

Knitting Jam – Laure Drogoul

Project America’s Next Top Multimedia Runway Survivor Idol (PANTMRSI!) – Andrea Silenzi

Pull My Ears – Brian House

The Republic of NYNEX – Matt Kane

WikiMixing – Brendan Baker

EXPERIENCE

ABATTOIR – Audrey Chen & Robert Van Heumen

Andrew Hayleck & Dan Conrad (Performance)

Arrington de Dionyso’s Malaikat dan Singa

Bonnie Jones (Performance)

Concert Earth – Naomi Lucille Kagaya & Stephanie Smith

Daishadokyo: A River Koan Performance – Geodesic Gnome

DJ Dubble8

DJ Trent

Easy Sonic Living

Endless Tapes – Lexie Mountain

Getting Closer – Eitan Isaacson & Jenny Asarnow

Hans Tammen Endangered Guitar / Adam Rokhsar Video (Performance)

Herbert Eckhart

Lilira: Soundscapes of Inukjuak – Nimalan Yoganathan

Locally Toned – T. Foley

Radio Fung Wah – David Levin & Andy Cavatorta

Matt Sterling (Performance)

multiphonic guitar soundscape – Benjamin Miller

Nelson’s Electric Chaircut – Nelson Loskamp

Parachute Dance – Sharlene Leurig & Thomas Deuel

Seeded Plain – Bryan Day & Jay Kreimer

The Shortwave Shindig – David Goren

Vistas – Josh Nagle & Owen Cartwright

Vocal Transformer – Daniel Fishkin & Kenji Garland

INSTALLATIONS

Little Sounds – Shelly Blake-Plock

Frequent Mutilations – Andrew O’Connor

Mutator – Lea Bertucci & Ed Bear

Nightmare Scenario – Aaron Henkin

North Avenue: NOISE – Steve Bradley

Poop + Memory – Big Shed

A Sense of Space – Thomas Deuel

Silosphere – Rebecca Bray & James Bigbee Garver

Symphonic Stitch – Laure Drogoul

A Thousand Voices – Ioana Jucan, Quyen Ngo, & Ryan Lester

The Thunder Wheel Array – Neil Feather

wake-making: ceremony of a polyrhythmic biogram – Melissa Moore

vibrating.AIR – Jason Sloan & Steve Bradley

LEARN

Artist’s Guide to Useful Technology – Harvestworks

The Cinema as a Concert Hall for the 21st Century – Alexis Bhagat

How to Score in Radio – Lawrence Lanahan & Bruce Wallace

Oversharing on the Radio – Benjamen Walker

Practical Cognitive Processes for the Audio Maker – Nick van der Kolk

Sounds of Grief – Ian Nagoski

The Sounds of Sex – Zachary Kent

Third Sight-seeing: Aesthetic Adventures in Sensory Substitution – Myroslaw Bytz & Nick Heling

Three Algorithms: Strange Connections Between Logic, Disorientation, & Experimental Music – John Berndt

Tour of Neil Feather’s Studio

SUNDAY EVENING

2640_MOVE_MUSIC

FEATURED

Felix Kubin

KUBIN

Felix arrives from Germany to present MEGAPOLIS with a Hoerspiel featuring excerpts of the radio play “Paralektronoia”, which explores the relationship between electricity and paranormality and its traces on the biographies of numerous pioneers of electronics. Russian Lev Sergeiewitch Termen, for example, invented not only the theremin but also a notorious wiretap for the KGB, while eccentric British music producer Joe Meek at times locked himself in his studio, armed, so the production of his sound effects might remain a secret. Kubin’s version, called “Paralektroniker”, is an active, mental radio with over-sensitive antennae; by means of systematic field research and radio-phonic experiments he investigates the impact of invisible vibrations on the human mind.

Felix Kubin is one of electronic music’s most dynamic and versatile performers. A lovechild of the home recording era, his activities include futuristic pop, radio plays, electroacoustic music, and works for chamber orchestra. Kubin’s music is saturated with enthusiasm for disharmonic pop, industrial noise, and 20th-century avant-garde music. In the last 20 years, he has released a diverse array of albums and played over 70 electronic music festivals. He likes to move between high and low culture, clubs and concert halls, as his main concern is the shifting of contexts and expectations. Kubin is on the cover of the June 2010 issue of the Wire Magazine, an internationally recognized journal of modern music. (Mr. Kubin’s performance is sponsored by the Association for Independents in Radio; his travel is sponsored by the Goethe-Institut in Washington DC)

David Kestenbaum

KEST

David explains how to take dangerously complicated, opaque stories and make them actually interesting, even exciting.

David Kestenbaum is a correspondent for NPR, covering science, energy issues and, most recently, the global economy for NPR’s multimedia project Planet Money. Since 1999 David has covered science’s discoveries and its darker side, including the Northeast blackout, the anthrax attacks and the collapse of the New Orleans levees. David has a Ph.D. in physics and has won awards from the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Physical Society and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. (Mr. Kestenbaum’s performance is sponsored by Transom.org)

Lucky Dragons – Luke Fischbeck & Sarah Rara

The name “lucky dragons” is borrowed from a japanese fishing boat caught in the fallout of hydrogen bomb test at bikini atoll in the 1950’s. the crew stricken ill, and the boat itself contaminated, the “lucky dragon” became a crystalizing symbol for the previously diffuse worldwide anti-nuclear sentiment. eventually the boat was painted black, renamed the “dark falcon”, and put into reuse as a fishing vessel, until it was retired and disposed of on the man- made trash island “dream island”, where it remains today.

Active since 2000 and based primarily in Los Angeles, “lucky dragons” means any recorded or performed or installed or packaged or shared or suggested or imagined pieces made by Luke Fischbeck, Sarah Rara, and/or any sometimes collaborators who claim the name. Fischbeck and Rara have presented interactive performances and installations in a wide variety of contexts–including MOCA Los Angeles, The Smell, Smithsonian’s Hirshorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, the Whitney Museum of American Art (as part of the 2008 Whitney Biennial), The Kitchen and PS1 in New York, the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, REDCAT and LACMA in Los Angeles, Frankfurt’s Schirn Kunsthalle, ICA London, ICA Philadelphia, and the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris.

BUILD

Atari Punk Consoles – Justin Sabe

Atari Punk Consoles are simple noise generators that are easy to customize by swapping out parts. MEGAPOLIS attendees will be making sweet sweet noises in 30-60 minutes just like this here.

Baltimore Node member Justin Sabe began playing music as a trumpet player in high school and then picked up didgerydo. The granular control of aspects of tamber in the didgerydo lead to exploring synthesis and interface. Justin has been recorded with several bands and played keytar in the goth/industrial band Ego Likeness where he toured Europe and the States with them several times. Currently he has returned to his life long love of making farting sounds with his lips and plays brass instruments in street bands.

Contact Mic Making – Ed Bear & Dan Fishkin

Piezo: derived from the Greek piezein, which means to squeeze or press.

Most microphones, the kind you sing into, pick up vibrations from the air molecules around us. But sound can travel through any medium, and inside solid objects a whole world of sound is waiting to be heard. Contact microphones are an inexpensive, incredibly sensitive tool to access and amplify this realm of sound. These devices have been widely embraced by the contemporary noise music community, but their musical history extends further back to when John Cage, in his quest for new sounds, utilized the contact-mic slinky in 1959—a sound which sproinged the world. The piezo was one of the first tools to liberate electronic music from the sterile (and, perhaps prohibitively expensive) university laboratory, and bring it to a level accessible by all.

Participants learn how to wire up their very own contact mic and discuss various methods of using it. No previous soldering experience required! We discuss the history of piezoelectric materials, and share ideas on how to use these fascinating tools; perhaps you’d like to amplify your doorspring, record the sound of snow crunching under your boots, or listen to the mammoth subharmonies of cocktail stirrers and rubber bands. This is an experiment-friendly course.

Daniel Fishkin is a musician/soundmaker who is influenced by Goethe’s Faust, and wood which is attached or unattached to the ground. Since 2005, Daniel has been building instruments of his own creation in order to listen to fantastic sounds. Daniel has performed and led workshops at the New Museum, SAIC, Bard College, and Bent Festival 2010.

Ed Bear, a founding member of the duo TwistyCat, is a musician and engineer working with found electronics, video, transmission and collective improvisation. He aims to technologically empower everyone as scientists and magicians and investigate the questionable calibration of human perception. He has toured across North America and Europe with Talibam!, performing at the Issue Project Room, Free103Point9, Tonic, The Montreal Pop Festival, Oberlin Conservatory of Music, and Duke University. In 2009, he received the Roulette Intermedia Emerging Composer Commission.

DIY Transmitter – Brett Ian Balogh

In this era of unprecedented media conglomeration, it has become important for the public to take media into their own hands. This workshop takes ado-it-yourself approach to broadcast media where participants will construct their own low-power FM radio transmitters. Participants will also learn about the issues of legality surrounding micro-power broadcasting as well as artistic/activist uses of the medium.

Brett Ian Balogh received his MFA in Studio from the Department of Art and Technology Studies at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and his B.A. in Biology from the University of Pennsylvania. He is currently an instructor at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and the Illinois Institute of Technology, teaching courses in architecture, computer-aided design and manufacturing, do-it-yourself broadcasting and acoustics. He is a founding member of the experimental sound performance collective, Clairaudient. Brett is also a Free 103.9FM transmission artist, a 2009-2010 AIRtime fellow, a member of the World Listening Project and the Midwest Society for Acoustic Ecology.

CREATE

B’more Soundwalk & Improv Workshop – Bonnie Jones & Suzanne Thorpe

Join electronic musicians/improvisers Bonnie Jones (Baltimore) and Suzanne Thorpe (NYC) as they guide a workshop designed to expand listening and musical interactions. Jones and Thorpe will guide attendants in listening expansion exercises based on Pauline Oliveros’ Deep Listening technique, followed by a soundwalk that will enhance their sonic relationship with their environment. During the walk, listeners will evolve into players, creating a composition with their environment and themselves. Participants are encouraged to bring noisemakers (bells, instruments, non-electric guitars etc).

Bonnie Jones works with sound, text and performance. Born in 1977 in South Korea she was raised by dairy farmers in New Jersey, and currently resides in Baltimore, MD. In sound performances Bonnie plays the circuit boards of digital delay pedals. Her primary sound collaborators are Joe Foster in Korea (as the duet “English”) and Andy Hayleck. She is also a member of the Performance Thanatology Research Society, a interdisciplinary performance group dedicated to the advancement of a higher histrionics brought on by imminent finalities. Bonnie has performed at the Kim Dae Hwan Museum, the Ontological-Hysteric Theater, the ErstQuake Festival, and the 14 Karat Cabaret. She is currently an MFA candidate at the Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts, Bard College.

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Collaboration of Bonnie Jones (electronics, microphones), Chris Cogburn (percussion), and Liz Tonne. 2007

Suzanne Thorpe is a composer and performer of electronic music who enjoys revealing peripheral consciousness, coexisting perspectives and concurrent realities via composition, performance and installation. Her recent compositions are multi-channel works that employ psycho-acoustic phenomena and tuned filtering systems. They have been featured at Issue Project Room (NYC), Diapason (NYC), The Stone (NYC), Activating the Medium Festival (San Francisco), No Idea Festival (Austin, TX), Redux Contemporary Art Studios (Charleston, SC), Pyramid Atlantic Center for the Arts (Silver Spring, MD), and other venues. She has been awarded support for her work from Meet the Composer and NYFA, and has a discography of over 20 recordings released on the Sony, V2, Beggars Banquet, Geffen, Specific Recordings and Tape Drift labels. Thorpe is a founding member of Mercury Rev, with whom she worked from 1989 – 2001, earning numerous critical accolades, and a gold record for 1998’s Deserters’ Songs, a member of The Wounded Knees and can be heard from time-to-time mucking it up with J Mascis of Dinosaur Jr., all three of whom she played with at 2009’s All Tomorrow’s Parties: The Nightmare Before Christmas in England. Currently she is touring with feedback artist Philip White as the duo thenumber46 in support of their newly released recording Bleach & Ammonia.

Book Odds REMIX – Roman Mars

REMIX Radio from PRX and the Third Coast International Audio Festival present a REMIX/ShortDoc challenge. The band The Books have selected eight sample sounds from their library of musical bits for us to remix into a minute-long composition in 30 minutes. Unlike the general Third Coast challenge (in which producers are required to select only two sounds to work with) the Megapolis Book Odds REMIXers will use all eight sounds (and any other sound they wish) and pull it all together in 30 minutes or less. Why? We do these things not because they are easy, but because they are hard. Selected pieces will be uploaded for broadcast on REMIX Radio (XM 136) immediately after the session.

Roman Mars is an award winning audio producer, reporter, and sound designer living in the East Bay. He is the “Remixer-in-Chief” for the Public Radio Exchange’s experimental XM satellite radio channel REMIX Radio (XM 136). He is also the Senior Producer on NPR’s Snap Judgment, a new, weekly storytelling program based in Oakland, CA. Roman spent three years with the Third Coast International Audio Festival at WBEZ in Chicago and he started his radio career at KALW in San Francisco with a program called Invisible Ink, an independent radio zine. If you Google his name, you will get several hundred pictures of statues.

Documentary Square Dance – The Place + Memory Project / Big Shed

We all have important places in our pasts. When we remember them, we remember part of who we used to be. Those places become touchstones for understanding how we became the people we are today. But what happens when those places disappear? The Place + Memory Project has been exploring this question for the last year. And we want you to get in on the fun. It’s going to be a nonstop storyswapping extravaganza in Baltimore. Shea Shackelford, Jennifer Deer, and Jesse Dukes of Big Shed are throwing 90-minute storytelling hoedown.

Together we will create our own audio map—a remembered landscape of sound and stories. To start things off, we’ll explore some of the stories we’ve already gathered. Then we’re going to get you on your feet and help you jog each other’s memories. After you’ve shared dozens of memories with each other, you’ll use your cell phones to record some of your favorite stories. Finally, exhausted from documentary bliss, we’ll all sit back, look at and listen to what you’ve created, and talk for a little while about what it’s all worth.

The more the merrier. And don’t worry about having prepared anything before you get there. Just bring yourself and your cellphone (you’ll need it).

Big Shed is…

Shea Shackelford is an independent audio evangelist who produces work for shows like NPR’s Weekend Edition and All Things Considered. Shea is also an audio educator and regular producer-in-residence at the Duke Center for Documentary Studies. He also collaborates with educators, artists and organizations—helping them design and integrate audio projects into their work.

Jennifer Deer is a writer, performer, and audio producer. Her work for radio has been aired on such nationally syndicated programs as NPR’s All Things Considered, Day to Day, and Weekend America. She co-curates podcasts for presentation on the audio documentary website www.BigShed.org

Jesse Dukes has finished nearly four years as Associate Producer for VFH Radio’s With Good Reason in Charlottesville, VA. Now, he’s completely independent (or, perhaps you prefer “unemployed”). Nobody knows where he’ll be at this time next year.

Exquisite Puppies: An Interactive Experiment – Dennis Conrow & Jesse Dukes

Do you have any dead puppies lying around? No, not stinking rotten canine corpses, but those little pieces of audio that you love but haven’t used? Resurrect your dead puppies with Jesse Dukes and Dennis Conrow as they lead you in a surrealist constrained creativity experiment based on the exquisite corpse. (Salvador Dali moustache optional.) It’s quite simple: the first player will be provided with a starter puppy, and then build on that beginning. After a set (and short) amount of time, the audio session will be passed to the next player, who can only hear the most recently added passage. Subsequent players add their puppies to ultimately assemble a Frankenpuppy, full of parts of resurrected loved tape.

If you want to play along, this session requires some homework: Pre-register by sending a 2-3 minute dead puppy in a high-quality audio format (192 kbs MP3, or .wav file) to dead.puppies [at] gmx.com. Then, come to Megapolis with your own ProTools-enabled workstation. If you want to just watch, or don’t have a computer to bring, let us know; we may be able to help a limited number of players.

Dennis Conrow produces the nationally distributed literary program New Letters on the Air, based in Kansas City, Missouri. He is able to perform the following miracles on demand: turning wine into 95% pure water in under two hours; harnessing electricity from the ether in selected, properly-equipped locations; and providing, at his own expense, life-saving carbon dioxide to plants and trees everywhere he goes. In contrast to many miracle-workers, Dennis Conrow is entirely visible to the naked eye all of the time, except when he is in disguise.

Jesse Dukes has finished nearly four years as Associate Producer for VFH Radio’s With Good Reason in Charlottesville, VA. Now, he’s completely independent (or, perhaps you prefer “unemployed”). Nobody knows where he’ll be at this time next year. Jesse Dukes is also part of the team that makes up Big Shed.

From the Ground Up: Making Music with Free Software – Patrick McNameeKing

During the workshop, Patrick will distribute copies of the open-source graphical programming environment Puredata. He will discuss different aspects of sound and how to create your own unique sounds. Then the group going to plug into a mixer and have a free-form aural exploration/jam session. This workshop is open to anyone: No previous knowledge about sound synthesis, computer programming, or special relativity is necessary. This is going to be a fun, playful exploration into some of the fundamentals of creating sound with a computer!

Patrick McNameeKing is a junior at American University where he studies Audio Technology. Pat first became interested in sound and technology in the sixth grade when he bought a bunch of CB radios at a yard sale and took them apart and rebuilt them. He continued to explore sound by mangling Casio keyboards and talking children’s toys beyond the point of recognition. He was very happy to learn that he could pursue this hobby as an adult in the form of a college degree.

Group Interactive Biofeedback Performance – Eric Lindley

A workshop and performance based on Topiary 2, a piece that uses biofeedback to generate music inadvertently from participants. Roughly, any willing person present will wear a comfortable velcro-and-tinfoil ring around his or her finger, which will connect to a computer system and generate music based on their Galvanic Skin Response (GSR—a measure of the degree of a person’s comfort or anxiety). When the entire group is connected, the music will be generated by their emotional state, and then be fed back into the room where it will affect their emotional state, creating a group feedback loop of music, representing the emotional contours of the group situation.

Informed by his background in Physics, Linguistics and Cognitive Science, Eric Lindley’s work is experimental, in the sense that he seeks answers to complex questions by undertaking defined procedures. As such, beyond mixing genres (fiction, poetry, memoir) and media (image, sound, text, electronics, participation), his work mixes discipline, borrowing sometimes-tongue-in-cheek logical paradoxes, contemporary scientific theory, and subtle linguistic and perceptual devices to pull apart the cognitive process and discover new ways to explore the social and meta-physical self.

Knitting Jam – Laure Drogoul

Be part of a musical knitting circle. Hardcore Knitters and non-knitters alike are welcome to play/knit on a souped-up, amplified knitting instrument. The Apparatus for Orchestral Knitting amplifies the sound of the knitting, is mixed and played back live. All materials supplied.

Laure Drogoul is an interdisciplinary artist and cobbler of situations who lives in Baltimore, Maryland. Her artworks are a hybrid, combination of video, sculpture and performance that invite audience participation. She is founding director of the The 14Karat Cabaret, Maryland Art Place’s performance space and cultural laboratory where she presents performance, music, film and hybrid acts of all sorts.

Nightmare Scenario – Aaron Henkin

What’s the worst nightmare you’ve ever had? What made it so nightmarish? How did you feel in the midst of this nightmare? How did you feel when you woke up? And what do you think might have caused the nightmare? Those questions and more will be posed and answered in this collective on-site audio installation called Nightmare Scenario. Aaron will be on-hand all day Saturday, when he’ll invite you into a soundproof room and ask you Qs. The collected recordings of your interviews will become the raw material for Aaron as he attempts the diabolical feat of creating … the ultimate nightmare. On Sunday, Aaron will re-emerge from his sound laboratory to unveil an audio homunculus of terrifying and revolting dimensions, a Frankenstein’s monster of a nightmare sewn together from the charnel house scraps of our collective unconsciousness. It will be, in two words, totally awesome.

Aaron Henkin is the creator of WYPR’s weekly programs Tapestry of the Times and Stories from the Stoop. He’s also a co-creator of WYPR’s long-running weekly cultural show, The Signal.

Project America’s Next Top … (PANTMRSI!) – Andrea Silenzi

Radio imitates reality … television. Love ‘em, mock ‘em, or ignore ‘em, reality television shows like “Project Runway” and “American Idol” have created a compelling format for watching deadline-driven artistic challenges. In the radio world, a similar trend of quickie creative competitions is emerging and spawning excellent work. This is the Olympics of MEGAPOLIS and only the bravest and quickest creators dare enlist. Come with the gear you got – flash recorders and protools ready laptops, iphone cameras and notebooks, your voice mail accounts and sketch books. Participants will be taken to a mystery location in Baltimore and assigned constraints intended to encourage radically new forms of multimedia storytelling only aliens on other planets know about.

Andrea Silenzi is a Chicago-based multimedia producer. She’s produces monthy live radio shows at the UCB Theater for WFMU’s “Seven Second Delay,” and has worked with the Third Coast Festival, WNYC’s Digital Culture project, WFMU’s Too Much Information, and PRI’s Studio 360. At last year’s Megapolis, Andrea coordinated the Megapovan, a mobile listening room with stops including a walking tour of Providence and a trip to the Athenian Diner with experimental composer Alvin Lucier.

Pull My Ears – Brian House

“Pull My Ears” happens when you send a text message to 917-284-8981. Try it now.

Brian House is a composer and conceptual artist making work through large gestures and small collisions.

The Republic of NYNEX – Matt Kane

The Republic of Nynex uses genetic algorithms to generate collages from user-submitted audio and ratings. Music, ambient noise, and voices are split up and randomly rearranged. The results are presented to a physical audience and Internet listeners. Audience ratings are used to rank the compositions, the best of which are mated and mutated to produce a new generation. The project is seeded with musical donations from a number of artists, mostly Boston-based. To listen and rate online, you can visit nynex.hydrogenproject.com or follow @nynexrepublic on Twitter. To participate, visit the website for instructions, or call (978) 406-9639 and leave a message. Newer audio is preferred by the algorithm when mutating, so frequent submissions will cause more interesting things to occur.

Matt Kane is a software engineer and occasional college radio DJ, who in his spare time writes software and obsesses over vinyl records (among other things). He is originally from Rhode Island and currently lives in Salem, MA with his wife and daughter.

WikiMixing – Brendan Baker

Mixing on a computer is usually a solitary endeavor: one person controlling one mouse and keyboard making one decision at a time. We’re going to try to fix that. Part workshop and part experiment in “crowd-sourced” audio art, this is like editing Wikipedia but with sound instead of text. Participants will be asked to provide four short sounds with four different sonic characteristics. (Details on uploading your audio files in advance here.) We’ll import all these sounds into a computer and collectively mix and manipulate them as a group in real-time using a bunch of colorful customized keyboard controllers, all connected to a single computer. The idea is to get as many hands/ears/minds at once collaborating (and competing) on the same soundscape, so that whatever strange, beautiful, or frightening noises that emerge are the product of our group’s collective will. Everyone is in control at the same time and yet no one is! NO prior audio software experience is necessary; everything you need to know is on the keyboards. (Pics coming soon!) Recordings of our experiments will be available immediately following the workshop. Visit drivebyhighfive.net/wikimixing for more information.

Brendan Baker is an independent producer, sound designer, and musician based out of Brooklyn, NY. He currently designs sound for The Onion News Network, produces audio tours for Antenna Audio and Pimzlo Media, and runs concerts for El Taller Latino Americano. He has worked with WNYC’s Studio 360, Curtis Fox Productions, The Argot Network and used to book shows at Grinnell College, where he studied music composition.

EXPERIENCE

ABATTOIR – Audrey Chen and Robert Van Heumen

ABATTOIR is a duo collaboration between Baltimore local musician Audrey Chen (cello/voice) and Robert Van Heumen (live sampling/electronics) from Amsterdam, NL. Rooted in free improvisation and experimental electronics, ABATTOIR perform music where Chen’s intense vocals and intricate cello playing are sampled, transformed and ripped apart by Van Heumen’s vigorous laptop actions. Together, they are able to create a deeply sensitive communication infused with a boundless feeling of release and letting go.

ABATTOIR has been a working project since its inception at the STEIM studios in 2008. The duo has performed and toured in US and in Europe (UK, Holland, Poland and the Czech Republic). Their debut CD was released last summer 2009 on Evil Rabbit Records.

Andrew Hayleck & Dan Conrad (Performance)

Dan Conrad conceived and developed a visual medium based on perceptual responses to kinetic color in the 1970’s while in the San Francisco Bay Area. Moving to Baltimore in 1976, he continued to explore color performance with a type of light instrument which he now calls “chromaccord”. Conrad studied painting at MICA, became a high school physics teacher, performed music and invented musical instruments, and created a form of “light painting” using LEDs with automatic control circuitry. In 2010, with the help of friends, he has materialized a digital chromaccord for color performance.

Andrew Hayleck is a sound artist who has lived in Baltimore, MD for the past ten years. Things used to make sound include amplified gong/wire, bowed metal (scrap metal, cymbals and musical saw), and electro-acoustic feedback. His work often deals with the passing of sound through different objects, and is often improvised. Recordings include: “Two Gong/Wire Pieces” (Ehse), “Gong/Wire” (Earlids), “Various Recordings Involving Ice” (HereSee), and “The Disappearing Floor” (Recorded).

Arrington de Dionyso’s Malaikat dan Singa

(Photo by Lucinda Roanoke)

Arrington de Dionyso’s Malaikat dan Singa creates throbbing, hallucinogenic trance-punk energy music using rock and roll cliches subverted by the kaleidescope of Tuvan throatsinging and bass clarinet. Oh, did we mention all of the lyrics are in Bahasa Indonesia using translations from William Blake and the Zohar? This festival closer is a dance party in the realm of magic!

Bonnie Jones (Performance)

Bonnie Jones will present a solo multidisciplinary piece that utilizes texts (found and written by the artist) and electronic sounds. The work takes a look at that space where humans encounter technology encountering humans and presents new ideas on how to “read” and “listen” to the shifting slipstream and landscape of our contemporary environment.

Bonnie Jones works with sound, text and performance. Born in 1977 in South Korea she was raised by dairy farmers in New Jersey, and currently resides in Baltimore, MD. In sound performances Bonnie plays the circuit boards of digital delay pedals. Her primary sound collaborators are Joe Foster in Korea (as the duet “English”) and Andy Hayleck. She is also a member of the Performance Thanatology Research Society, a interdisciplinary performance group dedicated to the advancement of a higher histrionics brought on by imminent finalities. Bonnie has performed at the Kim Dae Hwan Museum, the Ontological-Hysteric Theater, the ErstQuake Festival, and the 14 Karat Cabaret. She is currently an MFA candidate at the Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts, Bard College.

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Collaboration of Bonnie Jones (electronics, microphones), Chris Cogburn (percussion), and Liz Tonne. 2007

Concert Earth – Naomi Lucille Kagaya & Stephanie Smith

Come see and hear how choices you make with other community members have an impact on the environment! Concert Earth, an interactive multimedia performance, combines community engagement and cooperation with continually developing sonic and visual landscapes―allowing you to explore your role and affect in the vitality of our earth.

Naomi Lucille Kagaya, a native of Northern Japan, is an intermedia artist and composer. She creates installation and performance art integrating sonic and visual elements, digital and organic textures, and audience interactivity. She earned her BFA in Performing Arts Technology from the University of Michigan and holds an MFA in Digital Arts from the University of California at Santa Cruz. She is currently studying Experimental Sound Practices at California Institute of the Arts.

Stephanie Smith, originally from Texas, is a multiple-media sound artist that enjoys creating environments that move and influence the body. She often works with massive sounds and textures, tactile objects, and choreography. She is a graduate of the University of Chicago and is working toward an MFA in Experimental Sound Practices at the California Institute of the Arts.

Daishadokyo: A River Koan Performance – Geodesic Gnome

“You have just walked down this river in parable. In doing so you have

defeated me.”

“No, the river was in parable, but I have defeated you in fact.”

“The river is in fact. Your saying so is the greater parable.”

Baltimore’s super-group Geodesic Gnome (lead by philosopher/musician John Berndt) specializes in just three well-defined areas: 1. paradoxes as compositions, 2. “Gnomic utterances” and deliberate obscurity as content, and 3. the recreation of poorly understood historic incidents. Entirely out of the compartments of music, theatre, naturalism, and product focus groups, Geodesic Gnome are marco to your micro and micro to your macro. In “Daishadokyo” they combine all of their interests with Zen Archery and an obscure walk down the Jones Falls River to parse out a new kind of logic. With the amazing talents of Peter Blasser, Sarah El Jallad, John Eaton, Stephanie Barber, Mike Muniak and John Berndt.

DJ Dubble8

Erik Spangler (a.k.a. DJ Dubble8) is a composer and electronic musician working within a wide range of listening environments. His compositions have been performed across the United States and internationally from Canada to China, by ensembles including the Atlantic Brass Quintet, Boston Modern Orchestra Project, and International Contemporary Ensemble. Spangler works regularly with saxophonist Brian Sacawa as the genre-bending duo Hybrid Groove Project. Along with Sacawa, Spangler is also co-founder of the Contemporary Museum’s Mobtown Modern music series in Baltimore.

Using a combination of turntables and digital sampling along with acoustic instruments such as melodica and Spanish guitar, archival audio from Spangler’s family history will be remixed with newly composed layers. An inter-generational work will be created in homage to the life story and songs of his grandfather, Dale Spangler.

DJ Trent

Trent is a DJ at Jersey City’s WFMU, where he plays lots of Aaliyah and Fleetwood Mac. He specializes in doing party broadcasts from a beach, a back yard, a boat, a kitchen, whatever. He also does weddings and Bat Mitzvahs and produces podcasts for Engadget.com!

Easy Sonic Living

Easy Sonic Living, broadcasting live from the MEGAPOLIS festival in Baltimore on Saturday night, will be sampling the sounds of both the Baltimore metropolis and MEGAPOLIS’ gathering of audio artists and mixing it all up with our easy peasy chatter. Expect interviews, sound samples of the days’ events, an über-Canadian montage of all things northerly and an episode of the radio serial The Adventures of Kunzlecakes and Ovaries of Steel. Wanna come and talk about experimental radio? Wanna produce a small piece? Come check us out.

Easy Sonic Living is an experimental radio show that airs every second Tuesday night at 11pm on CKUT 90.3 FM in Montreal, Canada. Hosted by Caroline Künzle, Cathy Inouye and Neil Griffith — all three of which are involved in community radio, sound art, teaching media to youth, music and much more in and around Montreal. Go here for more about us and a link to the Megapolis broadcast.

Hans Tammen Endangered Guitar / Adam Rokhsar Video (Performance)

Hailed by their critics as “fiercely intrepid improvisers”, whose “…fingers stuck in a high-voltage outlet”, guitarist Hans Tammen and video artist Adam Rokhsar join forces on a journey through the land of unending sonic operations and aggressive video hallucinations.

Hans Tammen, who draws from his extensive experience as a programmer for undertakers, today works with a bizarre collection of mechanical devices on his “endangered” guitars, and uses an interactive software of his own design to rework his sounds in realtime. His music has been described by “Signal To Noise” as “…a killer tour de force of post-everything guitar damage”, AllAboutJazz recommended him: “…one of improvised music’s most fascinating proponents.”

Video artist Adam Rokhsar, originally a therapist and behavioral science specialist for juvenile sex offenders, designs sound for interactive installations, teaches computer music and video programming, and is working on a Master’s thesis on machine learning algorithms. He is the lead singer for Brooklyn-based indie rock band The Recovery, a computer music performer, and live video artist who has worked with a variety of musicians.

Herbert Eckhart – Louise Dam Eckardt Jensen & Luca Marini w/ Tom Blancarte

Herbert Eckardt is name of the monstrous freak of a collaboration between Danish saxophonist Louise D.E. Jensen and Italian drummer/percussionist Luca Marini (the group takes its name from both musicians’ little known middle names). Nonsense songs, super serious free improvisation, punk and other musical detritus are thrown together to create gaudy and fun messes in their performances. They have recently recorded their first album as a duo, tentatively titled “Frankenstein, I love you,” due to be released in late 2010. As a special guest, they have brought along Louise’s husband, bassist Tom Blancarte for their performance at MEGAPOLIS 2010.

Louise Dam Eckardt Jensen, based out of New York, has been an active performer in the jazz and experimental scene around the world for the past 8 years. She is best known for her work as a solo performer and performing with her ‘Spaced Out Ensembles,’ featuring her own idiosyncratic and sensitive compositions arranged for winds, brass and hyperactive rhythm section and her duo project with bassist and husband Tom Blancarte. In New York she collaborates as well with such artists as Kevin Shea, Brandon Seabrook, Dan Blake, Sam Oats, John Bernard Wagner and Carol Liebowitz.

Luca Marini is a German/Italian drummer currently based in New York City who currently performs with The Little (with Pär Lammers, Santiago Botero, Noe Escola), Tatune (Guillaume Heurtebize, Santiago Botero), Herbert Eckardt, Blin (duo with dutch guitar player Jasper Stadhouders) and Van der Weide/Fariello/Marini trio. He performed and toured in Europe and North America playing improvised music, jazz, rock and electronic music. He studied at the Conservatories of Nice and Paris in France, at the Conservatory of Amsterdam in the Netherlands, at the University of Montreal in Canada and at Purchase College in New York

Bassist/composer Tom Blancarte grew up in Austin, Texas and later attended the University of North Texas in Denton. He was first inspired to play music by listening to bands like Slayer and Black Sabbath, then discovered musicians like Evan Parker and Anthony Braxton later on. He moved to New York City in 2004, where continues to reside with his wife Louise.

Lilira: Soundscapes of Inukjuak – Nimalan Yoganathan

Nimalan recently returned from a two-month artist residency in Inukjuak, Nunavik (funded by Conseil des arts et des lettres du quebec) where he was recording the arctic environment to gain insight into the richness of Inuit culture. For his upcoming performance at MEGAPOLIS, the audience will be surrounded by six speakers and immersed within sonic portraits of this Northern community. This will include natural sounds such as wind, water, and huskies, as well as cultural sounds such as traditional carvers and Inuit throat singers. Nimalan will complement these sounds with live electronics and percussion to accentuate an inherent musicality hidden from the naked ear. Through a structured improvisation, his goal is to mimic the timbral and rhythmic properties of Inukjuak using electronic gestures, similar to how Inuit throat singers employ the human body to mimic sounds of mosquitoes, geese, and wind. Nimalan will also use the opportunity to present the Inukjuak Sound Map.

Nimalan Yoganathan is a Montreal sound artist and musician. He holds a B.Eng in Electrical Engineering and a BFA in Electroacoustic Music. He currently focuses on the integration of field recordings into his electronic compositions from his travels through bustling cities, desolate landscapes, and spiritual sites. This serves to accentuate the gray area between synthesized and natural sounds. In a time when global communities are progressively being plagued by noise pollution, Nimalan believes it is crucial to preserve and accentuate the subtle but musical sounds hidden all around us. He has released experimental Dub and Hip-Hop albums on labels including Le Son 666 and No_Type. His works have been disseminated at numerous festivals and venues including MUTEK, Suoni per il Popolo, Pop Montreal, Canadian 60X60, Art’s Birthday, OBORO, and Darling Foundry.

Locally Toned – T. Foley

During her *Mobile* Ringtone Performance, artist T. Foley uses her cell phone and rechargeable battery-operated equipment to broadcast and amplify select audio from her public art/original ringtone creation project, Locally Toned. All equipment for the performance (broadcast and visual media) is lightweight and wearable, allowing the artist to traverse almost anywhere to perform. A limited series of art cards, worn by the artist and distributed during the performance, feature photographs of tone collaborators. The cards include printed codes that users may text to Locally Toned to issue requests for specific tones to be delivered directly to cell phones.

Locally Toned is a not-for-profit venture that involves individuals in the creation of original ringtones, and provides the free tones to the public via a website and MMS (multimedia messaging service) distribution. The ringtones–tiny aural documentaries, sonic mementos, and soundscape snippets–answer the question, “What does Pittsburgh (or any environment, for that matter) sound like?” Locally Toned utilizes the airspace as public property for purposes of sonic transmission–the work performs itself” when participants receive calls on their cell phones. The goals of the project are technological empowerment, community service and the substitution of a system of shared creativity for one of commerce (the distribution of music industry ringtones).

Radio Fung Wah – David Levin & Andy Cavatorta

For thousands of travelers in the northeast corridor, the Fung Wah bus is a cheap lifeline between cities. It’s the original Chinatown bus line, the unofficial “public transportation” for the Boston-Washington corridor (as the Megapolis festival’s own website points out.) It’s famous for its $15 tickets, its white-knuckle driving, even the occasional bus fire. But it’s also famous for the stories it generates.

Passengers have heard marriage proposals, have woken from drug-induced fugue states en route to New York, have had illicit love affairs with ballerinas they met on the road. Even the owner of the Fung Wah, Pei Lin Liang, has a story—as a master Chinese opera musician, his is about immigrant experience and artistic expression.

The Fung Wah is literally a vehicle for these stories, a common thread that ties them together. In this installation, explore the larger story of the bus: the popular myths of its origins, the experience of its riders, the realities of Liang’s immigrant experience, and the music he creates as a release from it. All these stories will be part of a non-linear narrative, using low-wattage FM transmitters to broadcast bits of audio, interviews, etc from hidden locations throughout the North Arts District. By walking with a small radio tuned to one frequency, listeners can discover the story piece-by-piece, gradually revealing the greater Fung Wah experience as they explore.

David Levin is an audio producer living in Boston. He’s the resident podcaster and web audio editor for NOVA, the PBS science series, where he’s covered topics ranging from sexual cannibalism to string theory. Prior to NOVA, David contributed to NPR’s All Songs Considered, All Things Considered, The Connection, and PRI’s American Routes. He has a music degree, and is not afraid to use it.

Andy Cavatorta is a raconteur and robot builder. He’s directed bike-based films, been stranded on an island, and has played the world’s largest Van De Graaff generator. Andy also designs robotic instruments for the MIT Media Lab and for Ensemble Robot, a Boston-based music collective. He currently lives in Boston above the Fung Wah Bus office.

Matt Sterling (Performance)

Matt Sterling has been making music for more than 10 years. He takes cues from a number of sources including the improvisational aspects of jazz, the DIY attitude of punk, and the soul-of-the-machine ethos of techno. Working almost entirely in synthesized sounds, he has developed a unique sound that can engage both the body and the mind at once. More recently he has taken that same strategy to the visual realm and has been developing video systems to compliment the musical aspect. The visual displays draw from abstract impressionist paintings, psychedelic light shows, and experimental videos, but utilize the computing power available to form a dynamic relationship with the music. Mr. Sterling hopes to create an environment that immerses the audience in a hypnotic experience.

multiphonic guitar soundscape – Benjamin Miller

Graphic Score Improvisation Workshop

Discussion on musical intepretation of visual source material as well as pre-conceived structure, chance operations, hyper-awareness and deep-listening states of creative decision-making during “free Improvisation”. Attendees will create graphic scores dealing with modes of organization and learn how to record improvisations using the scores. Participants can bring any instrument they wish or just use their voice(s).

21st Century Composition

A brief overview of my unique all-interval method of composition inspired by Arnold Schoenberg’s 12-tone method, a technique that maintains intervallic hierarchy rather than pitch. After studying orchestral examples of Miller’s method the group will co-compose a piece together, flesh it out and rehearse it. By the end of the workshop the participant will have the tools to compose an all-interval composition. Participants can bring a traditional Instrument, keyboard or voice; reading traditional notation is a plus.

Benjamin Miller’s intuitive approach to creating a quasi-dimensional sound field features a deconstructed electric guitar modified with multiple pickups. First used in the Michigan art band GKW in 1982 and then with Chicago’s Dirty Old Man River in the mid-90’s, Miller (brother of Mission of Burma’s Roger Miller) focuses on a textural, cacophonic amalgamation that defies standard guitar playing. With the addition of electronics and analog tape, it is difficult to discern where any one sound originates or where it is heading. “If new expressionists closed their eyes and painted what they saw then Ben Miller must be taping shut his ears and playing what he hears: blood thrashing through arteries, nerves popping, synapses burning,.. Formerly a part of the ‘anti-rock band’ Destroy All Monsters, Miller takes the ‘anti’ idea a step further.” — Detroit Metro Times

(Listen at MySpace / more on Miller’s approach to multiphonic guitar)

Endless Tapes – Lexie Mountain

In this installation, the audience determines the course of the sound generation, modifying and participating in its progress from nothingness to cacophony. Sounds created by the audience will be recorded onto endless cassettes during the performance, gently mixed and built upon throughout the event. Please feel free to bring noisemakers, soundthings, clapping hands, loud tongues, and an eagerness to build upon the ever-buildable.

Massachusetts-bred, Baltimore-based vocalist and performance artist Lexie “Mountain” Macchi is best known for her work with the unpredictable all-female a capella ensemble Lexie Mountain Boys. She is also the lead singer of rock outfit Crazy Dreams Band, part of John Berndt’s experimental performance outfit Geodesic Gnome, one-half of Bad Girls with fellow Mountain Boy Samantha Garner. Recently, she can be seen dipping a hairy toe into the waters of stand-up comedy with co-Gnome Ric Royer as “Martin & Lawrence.”

Getting Closer – Eitan Isaacson & Jenny Asarnow

Download the Getting Closer application (take a flyer from the registration desk, it has instructions). Open it up. Now you hear stuff! The stuff you hear can only be heard right here, where you hear it. The sounds are virtually embedded in the landscape with GPS. There are treats for you to listen to around the Megapolis venues. There is also a romantic field trip. Getting Closer will tell you which way to go: listen carefully.

You need an iPhone for this, so make friends with someone who has one, and share! Leave 1-1.5 hours to go on the field trip. You will want to bring headphones, bus fare, and your walking shoes.

Eitan Isaacson made the Getting Closer application. He has been developing open source software for ten years. He has gone over to the dark side to create this iPhone application.

Jenny Asarnow made the sounds you hear in Getting Closer. She makes radio (at KUOW Public Radio and Hollow Earth Radio, both based in Seattle) and music (it’s called Sweet Potatoes). She is the creator of The Corner, an interactive art installation and public radio documentary created with neighbors around a Seattle street corner, which was made possible by Maker’s Quest 2.0 initiative from the Association of Independents in Radio, Inc.

Nelson’s Electric Chaircut – Nelson Loskamp

The original amplified haircut performance! It is an interactive, electro-sonic, haircut performance. Volunteers are taped to the chair, their eyes and mouth are also taped to symbolize the fetishism of appearance. The hair is then cut by Nelson, the original master of electro-sonic hair design. The various implements are amplified, scissors and clippers wired to effects pedals, slung round his waist, and blasted through an amplifier strapped to his back. The whacking haircutting sounds reverberates in a trance like cacophony of seemingly random patterns, as the true stylistic nature of the volunteer is released.

Originally conceived in San Francisco, Nelson Loskamp has been performing Electric Chaircut, amplified haircuts, worldwide since 1989. CNN calls Electric Chaircut “A cut above”; NBC says “It’s a sidewalk sensation”; and the NY Times calls it “Cutting edge!”

Parachute Dance – Sharlene Leurig & Thomas Deuel

Parachute Dance transforms the child’s parachute – a circular cloth used for collaborative play in gymnasiums throughout America – into an interactive performance space in which participants modify music by manipulating the parachute, thereby becoming choreographers, composers and performers. A network of sensors imbedded in the parachute measures the parachute’s shape, and those measurements are used to modulate the accompanying music. The music itself is a constant driving force, composed of train sounds from the Northeast Corridor as the underlying percussion and with found sounds and field recordings filling out melodic and harmonic components. This music plays throughout the performance, but is constantly modified by participants’ movements. The parachute becomes a performance space (the rotunda circumscribing the dancer’s stage) and an instrument for dance choreography and musical composition. Since participants are connected to the same cloth, all may suggest movement through manipulation of the parachute. But while all may send impulses into the system, some will be attenuated and others amplified, filtering individual will and freeing all from the burden of individual expression. In this way, Parachute Dance may create the conditions for participants to discover ecstatic dance and spontaneous performance.

Sharlene Leurig has a long history of costume production and electronics building, though not always in combination. She is interested in the possibilities of enabling strangers and the spotlight-leery to discover collaborative performance through approachable technologies and nostalgic or familiar objects associated with playtime.

Thomas Deuel is a neurologist and neuroscientist whose research focuses on the processing of music and sound by the brain via electrophysiology (EEG). He studied music as an undergraduate and continues to compose original music.

Seeded Plain – Bryan Day & Jay Kreimer

Nebraska improvised music unit Seeded Plain performs pieces shaped by the possibilities suggested by the instruments they’ve built, graphic scores, and in response to collaborators. Founded in 2007 by Bryan Day and Jay Kreimer, Seeded Plain has performed throughout the Midwest US and Europe. Seeded Plain’s first release ‘Land Tracts’ was released in 2008 to positive critical reviews in North America, Europe and Japan. Their upcoming release ‘2′ will be available this year on Creative Sources. Seeded Plain is currently working with Nebraska playwright and director Robert Stewart on the soundtrack for his upcoming theatrical production ‘Inferno Terra Firma.’

Bryan Day is an improviser, composer, instrument builder, and concept artist based in Lincoln, NE. Originally from Minneapolis, he arrived in Nebraska by way of Iowa, where he studied illustration and sculpture. Day focuses on intuitive sound performance using unconventional techniques in prepared environments. His instruments are constructed using practical composite designs, melding everyday objects with finished oak and metal forms. Day’s idiosyncratic compositional methods and personal sonic vocabulary evoke a sense of uncomfortable balance.

Jay Kreimer is a musician, instrument maker, sculptor, composer and educator. More to the point, he is an alchemist of hardware stores, surplus catalogs, and discarded objects, who assembles new things out of scraps of possibility. Kreimer performs with The Mighty Vitamins and Seeded Plain, as well as solo.

The Shortwave Shindig – David Goren

An overnight immersion in the wavering, crackly sonics of the shortwave radio spectrum. Every day we stride through a stew of signals: our bodies vibrating imperceptibly to a riot of ouds, harmoniums, raving preachers, propaganda, secret messages, electronic squawks, and beeps. We lack only the transistors and diodes to be able to decode them. With a phalanx of receivers and gossamer strands of antennae, the Shortwave Shindig invites listeners to decipher the distant and elusive sounds of the shortwave bands. Several shortwave radios will be available for tuning; participants are encouraged to bring a shortwave radio if they have one. (Schedule and segment length subject to change.)

9pm-11:30: Mercy, So Much Noise

A crisp and creamy mix of real-time and archival shortwave audio, with remote feeds plucked from the Megaverse; and via Myke Dodge Weiskopf, LA based radio producer and editor of ShortWaveMusic.

11:30-2 am: Whammy Bar

The radio frequency spectrum provides accessible, constantly morphing aural textures that have a rich history influence on sound artists and musicians, both experimental and pop. We’ll dip a toe into this vast repertoire with recordings from William Basinksi, Holger Czukay, Yo La Tengo, Alessandro Bosetti (with live commentary from Berlin) and many more, plus live performances from Myke Dodge Weiskopf, Shea Shackleford, and possible otherness.

Thus inspired, all Shortwave Shindiggers will be invited to craft new radioscapes incorporating receiver improvisations and post-production techniques. Listeners are encouraged to bring laptop-based production gear to make their own pieces.

2am-dawn: The Shortwave Shindig Afterparty

Cast asunder from The Hexagon at 2 am, and clutching our receivers like prophetic stone tablets, we will wander the deserted streets of Baltimore until we alight somewhere to continue production, and chase the gray line, the terminator between darkness and light which enhances reception before and after sunrise.

David Goren is a radio producer and audio archivist who has been messing around with shortwave sound for almost 40 years. http://www.shortwaveology.com

Silosphere – Rebecca Bray & James Bigbee Garver

A Silosphere is a personal audio and visual experience. The user places a large globe over his or her head, blocking their vision. A small video camera is mounted on top of the globe. The inside of the globe is black; in front of the user’s eyes is a small screen which displays the view from the camera. The only way for the user to see in front of him/her is through the small screen. Speakers inside the globe transmit a personal spectrum of ambient textures, beats, and melodies to the user. With the Silosphere on one’s head, the user arrives in front of a large mirror and experiences – via the small interior screen – video images reflected onto the sphere, pulsing in harmony with the interior soundscape. The Silosphere explores ideas around the science of mediated experience, radiation, sonic projection, and electromagnetism.

Rebecca Bray is an award-winning interactive design director, and has been developing strategic, creative media for over 12 years. She is the co-founder of New York City-based interactive design studio Submersible Design, and a professor of graduate studies at NYU’s Interactive Telecommunications Program located in the Tisch School of the Arts. She has created and produced multimedia technologies for internationally recognized cultural institutions including The American Museum of Natural History; The Smithsonian Institution; The Whitney Museum of Art; and The Intrepid Museum of Air, Sea and Space.

James Bigbee Garver is a freelance composer & sound designer for theatre and dance based in Washington, DC. He has created sound designs in New York City Off Broadway and at numerous venues including Performance Space 122 and Joyce SoHo. He’s currently the resident composer for East Third Ensemble. In 2006 he co-founded the Tiny Dance Film Series (tinydancefilms.com) with choreographer Peter Kyle, an installation series that consists of very short and very small dance films presented on tiny screens in a darkened kiosk for an audience of one. His sound design for Synetic Theatre’s play “Kafka’s Metamorphosis” is currently playing in Rosslyn, VA.

Vistas – Josh Nagle & Owen Cartwright

Vistas (Josh Nagle, and Owen Cartwright) have come from Camden, Maine and will be presenting their most recent works in electronic music, as well as selections from their debut album “mute” released earlier this year. Their performance is an opportunity to allow the music to create itself, not binding themselves to any previous recordings, vistas hope is to make every performance unique to the context of the space and the people listening. Many of the sounds are acoustic or found recordings, as well as software instrumentation. During performance they incorporate responsive visual projections made up of abstract imagery.

Vistas have been known to promote and accelerate slight movements of the body, such as toe tapping, and head bobbing. Do not be alarmed as this reaction is normal.

Vocal Transformer – Daniel Fishkin & Kenji Garland

Vocal Transformer is a project which explores atypical solutions to circuit bending. Instead of relying on switches and RCA cables to make bends, connections are made by banks of reed switches, which respond to magnets. Magnets are twirled above the reeds, and clusters of connections are made and unmade in seconds, faster and more gracefully than any cord could be unplugged. Hands pass over the grid of switches, and we hear apixelated representations of the gesture above them. The Casio becomes an electronically prepared piano, and magnets of different sizes, shapes and orientations influence the sound depending on their placement above the reeds. The quivering of the reed-switches is amplified, adding the delicate hum of crickets to the sonic debris. These sounds are wrapped around the human voice, as VOCAL TRANSFORMER croon with the tempered grace of a sleepy lounge singer. In science class, kids used to huddle around the TV screen and bend their reality with magnets when the teacher wasn’t watching. We keep the computer as far away as possible, fearing the data death which could occur if a magnet gets too close.

Daniel Fishkin is a musician/soundmaker who is influenced by Goethe’s Faust, and wood which is attached or unattached to the ground. Since 2005, Daniel has been building instruments of his own creation in order to listen to fantastic sounds. Daniel has performed and led workshops at the New Museum, SAIC, Bard College, and Bent Festival 2010.

Kenji Garland is a video-musician, or something, whose primary influences include HyperCard, phosphorescence, and a desire to drastically alter/enhance the way the video signal reflects and inhabits our perceived environment. This is a study of forces beyond our ordinary perception.

INSTALLATIONS

Frequent Mutilations – Andrew O’Connor

Frequent Mutilations is a performed installation that celebrates one of the longest running radio art programs in North America. Four reel to reel machines weave together a series of giant analog tape loops. Each loop is of a different duration and every few minutes one of the loops is brought down, and a new one is spliced live into the mix to create a slowly evolving, slightly random composition, much like the radio program that inspired it. For about 25 years CKMS FM a small campus radio station in Waterloo (just outside of Toronto) broadcast a weekly hour long radio art program called Frequent Mutilations that produced by a rotating cast of programmers. This installation is both a new incarnation or live version of the program, and a celebration of the 1000 plus hours of original radio art produced for the show.

Andrew O’Connor is an independent radio producer from Toronto, Canada. He has been active in community radio for over 14 years now contributing to stations like Shouting Fire Radio in San Francisco, and CKLN in Toronto. His work for CBC Radio has been heard on shows like The Signal, Metro Morning, and The Current. Andrew’s work as a sound artist has been featured at the Vancouver New Music Festival, the Third Coast Filmless Festival, and this summer will be shown at the Sound Symposium in St Johns Newfoundland.

Little Sounds – Shelly Blake-Plock

This sound experiment is about little sounds. Sounds that otherwise go unnoticed. Participants are presented with small natural sounds and then have the opportunity to reflect on what they hear. Their reflections will be recorded and turned into a sound collage over the course of the festival.

Shelly Blake-Plock is an artist and teacher from Baltimore. A member of the High Zero Foundation, he helps organize the annual High Zero Festival, the Hypnotic Exotic stage at ArtScape, and the weekly Red Room performance series.

Mutator – Lea Bertucci & Ed Bear

Mutator is an installation generated by the process of transferring a musical performance across boundaries of medium, time, and space. Initiated by a series of compositions for expanded woodwinds and electromechanical percussion, the installation crystallizes onto two tape loops which are broadcast on separate site-specific commercial FM radio stations. The percussion (bass drum, snare drum, and cymbals) is played by simple solenoid-driven mechanisms which are controlled by firmware algorithms. The mic’d and mixed down percussion generate rhythms and effects while reacting to input sources (audio signals, sensors, and triggers). A sculptural multitude of radios installed in the space continuously echo the aural impression of the performance while the drums play on. The drum machine listens to all three FM stations, reacting to the tape loops and the sound of its own making; slowly and organically evolving with in the installation soundscape.

Lea Bertucci is a Brooklyn-based artist who works with photography, video installation and sound. Born in 1984 in the Hudson Valley, she received her BA in Photography from Bard College in 2007. After relocating to New York City in 2007, she won a fellowship from the Tierney Foundation to expand her body of work. Her visual art focuses on subverting the representational boundaries of the photographed image through light, space and architecture. Formally trained since the age of 10 in various woodwind instruments, she is also one half of the electro-acoustic woodwind duo Twisty Cat and continues to work with sound in the context of microtonal harmony and feedback. In 2009 she was awarded a Young Composer’s Commission from Roulette Intermedium. She is currently an artist in residence at the Smack Mellon gallery in Brooklyn.

North Avenue: NOISE – Steve Bradley

A sound art composition using the windows of the Windup Space as a large tympanum that will pick up the vibrations from the street and transmit the sounds through a series of multiple FM transmitters and receivers, creating a feedback loop. Through each transmitter this low power radio piece rebroadcasts the signal to the next transmitter at 4 different frequencies over the FM dial. The final transmission is remixed into the original sound from the street windows creating a slightly off synch or “double image.” Periodically, beat frequencies will emerge from the broadcast airs depending on the amplitude from the streets. The final transmission will saturate the airwaves on the corner of North Avenue and Charles Street, Baltimore, Maryland, with a checkerboard pattern.

Steve Bradley teaches at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and currently serves as the Graduate Program Director of the Imaging and Digital Arts MFA program. He’s an inter-media artist who currently works with low-frequency sound that resonates below the threshold of human hearing, but when broadcast on-site, reveals the structure of environmental acoustics. In 1998, Steve Bradley founded art@radio, a net broadcast project. Bradley’s has toured and recorded with Alien Productions/edition Kunstradio in Austria; exhibited at Kiasma Museum, Helsinki, and at Seville Biennial; was commissioned by Sonic Circuits to perform at Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; and he was included in a limited-edition, artbox cd by Public Guilt Records, Baltimore. Most recently, Bradley installed a commissioned sound piece in Wattenmeer mud flats on the North German coast; during low tide, the North Sea winds and rising water played the instruments.

Poop + Memory – Big Shed

Hear reflections on memorable bathrooms, johns, toilets, outhouses, waterclosets, loooos and potties (and improvised locations) from folks just like you. And while you’re there, leave your own story. Just pick up your phone, and call the Poopline – (888) 921-4224. Or if you really have to go, you don’t have to wait for Baltimore. Call anytime! Check out some of the collected Poop Memories at www.poopandmemory.org

Check out Big Shed’s Square Dance for their bios.

A Sense of Space – Thomas Deuel

This piece consists of two sound installations, juxtaposing found sounds with abstractions of travel photographs. When traveling, most people take photographs and use them to communicate a sense of what the experience of being in that place might have been like. However, the acoustic environment – recorded via ‘phonographs’ – can provide a tremendous amount of the sense of place and feeling of a location in a different way than photographs. Here, musical soundscapes replace photographs. The first piece comes from sounds collected in Rajasthan, India – the basic rhythmic figure comes from a third class train. Other field recordings that make up the melodic and harmonic components of the song include rickshaw horns, Hindu chants, monkeys, and Muslim calls to prayer.

The second piece comes from the Indian Himalayas – the basic rhythmic figure is also a local train providing transportation. The minimal visual presence in the pieces intentionally provides only a suggestion of the place: shifting blurry and abstract images, initiating a subconscious suggestion of what the place may look like. The listener then must use the sonic environment to create a sense of place.

Thomas Deuel is a neurologist and neuroscientist, whose research focuses on the processing of music and sound by the brain via electrophysiology (EEG). He studied music as an undergraduate, and now plays guitar and trumpet in a jazz ensemble, as well as composing original music.

Symphonic Stitch – Laure Drogoul

Symphonic Stitch is a listening parlor in which the participant is invited to experience the sonic rhythms of knitting both visually and aurally.

Laure Drogoul is an interdisciplinary artist and cobbler of situations who lives in Baltimore, Maryland. Her artworks are a hybrid, combination of video, sculpture and performance that invite audience participation. She is founding director of the The 14Karat Cabaret, Maryland Art Place’s performance space and cultural laboratory where she presents performance, music, film and hybrid acts of all sorts.

A Thousand Voices – Ioana Jucan, Quyen Ngo, & Ryan Lester

What would the world sound like if every time the question “How are you?” were asked, it was answered truthfully? ‘A Thousand Voices’ is a sound installation presented by Brown University’s Listening LabOratory radiophonic performance group. Inspired by artists who, in their desire and passion to create a “new world” during the revolutionary period in Russia (roughly 1918-1923), made buildings and public spaces speak to convey their messages to the public, the Listening LabOratory wanted to use sound art and technology to give individuals the opportunity to share their hopes, dreams, anxieties, and aspirations. The voices of people from different places and of different ages answering the question “How are you, truthfully?” will be transmitted through hundreds of piezo speakers using wooden poles as a medium for the sound. The installation uses the guiding metaphors of “home” and “borders” to form a community of voices in a unique aural experience. At MEGAPOLIS, you, too, will have an opportunity to walk through and explore this community.

A Thousand Voices Artistic Director Ioana Jucan is a multidisciplinary performance artist primarily focused on directing and playwriting. Her latest lyric-dramatic text, “The Face Lost in the Book”, will be published in the Valley Humanities Review (April 2010). Her play “Self-employed” was presented in the “Reading-Performances” Section of the Sibiu International Theatre Festival (Romania, June 2008) and published in the 2008 Anthology of this Festival. Ioana is the host and producer of Hi-Story-a, on BSR, Brown Student and Community Radio, 88.1fm.

Quyen Ngo works as a 95.5 WBRU Radio News Reporter and Anchor as well as the Urban Programming Director for WBRU-fm’s ‘The 360° Experience in Sound.’ She is an AT&T New Media Fellow contributing to a project called “The Global Conversation,” an online media portal of documentary films, podcast series, and other audio/video addressing social challenges.

Ryan Lester is Rock Director, host of “The Archaeology of Crates,” and reporter at Brown Student and Community Radio. He is also Non-Fiction Editor of Issues Magazine, a collaborator of The Art Movement, and a sound designer for several theatrical performances.

The Thunder Wheel Array – Neil Feather

Thunder wheels make the sounds of rolling thunder. First a bicycle wheel has its tire studded with 10 to 30 strong magnets. Then a drumhead gets a magnet sandwich mounted towards the center of its head. The wheel is mounted to the drum such that the wheel magnets repel the drumhead magnets as the wheel magnets spin past. The wheel is spun and it sounds like thunder.

Five Thunder wheels of varied design will be installed so that viewers can interact with the Thunder wheels and create sonic weather. (Made possible by generous generosity of Velocipede.)

Sound mechanic Neil Feather has been creating radical and unusual musical instruments since 1970 and is increasingly known outside of Baltimore as one of the most original musical thinkers of his day. His instruments each embody uniquely clever acoustic and engineering principles, and are visually arresting. The music he plays on the instruments is equally original, embodying new principles and resulting in a nearly alien idiom of music. A founding member of THUS and THE OFFICIAL PROJECT, as well as the leader of AEROTRAIN, he has a long history of collaborative projects and solo concerts, and he teaches a sound sculpture course at the Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore MD. More info about feather an his Instruments can be found at www.neilfeather.org

wake-making: ceremony of a polyrhythmic biogram – Melissa Moore

This installation creates moments that are in transport and go between re-articulations and potentialities, an “abstract machine” of sorts, one that is unstable and contains a spatiotemporal duplicity. With the use of traditional African ceremonial drumming music and invented polyrhythm machines, Moore employs a technique that shifts layered polyrhythms into abstract polyrhythms that are biogrammatic in nature; a language of the body that brings external realities into the internal field. The installation consists of polyrhythm machines that will employ gear motors, actuators, contact microphones and battery controlled speed motor controllers. The actuators will strike various objects and liquid medium at different speeds, rhythms, and frequencies and will be picked up by contact mics and hydrophones that will be sent through EQ and mixed live.

Melissa Moore’s composed work involves the magnification of minute sound sources, focusing attention on the physical properties of materials and unusual acoustic phenomena in a reductive and elemental way. She works with such diverse sources as field recordings, fire, water, invented instruments, electronics, percussion, guitar and voice. She is also interested in the seemingly unlikely intersection of traditional musics (mainly drums, guitar and other traditional string instruments) combined with electronic music. Her current music and performance work involves machine-sewn, clear-vinyl portable structures of her own design and construction.

vibrating.AIR – Jason Sloan & Steve Bradley

Employing a variety of RF receivers; shortwave radios, police scanners, and the live feed from North Avenue: Noise. Sloan and Bradley will produce a multi- textural carpet of undulating radio-phonic sound. Through the various layers emerge radio transmissions of live and fragmented voices, and of glitches and hisses from the Baltimore City Streets.

Jason Sloan is an electronic musician, composer, sound and net.work artist, and professor teaching full-time in the Interaction Design and Art [IxDA] Department at the Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, Maryland. His work explores life cycles, memory, and religious behavior within a framework of the virtual world. In 2002 Sloan co-founded SLO.BOR Media with sound artist & web designer Matt Borghi as a vehicle for their individual releases and a platform for other artists. Sloan has exhibited internationally including Berlin, Copenhagen, Edinburgh, Kiev, Nagoya, Saint Petersburg, Toulouse, and Vienna and has recorded with various labels and is broadcast on international radio programs.

See above for Steve Bradley’s bio.

LEARN

Artist’s Guide to Useful Technology – Hans Tammen & Adam Rokhsar / Harvestworks

The “Artist’s Guide to Useful Technology” is an ongoing project of workshops, performances, symposia, consultations, tutorials and problem-solving forums taught by Harvestworks staff at art and music centers in the US. These events, which are free and open to the public, will give participants hands-on knowledge and instruction, and instructors will be tailoring the event to the needs of the audience and thus students from all skill levels are encouraged to attend.

Over the past 30 years Harvestworks has become a leading center of music technology and is home to artists and instructors who are experts in their practice. Hans Tammen and Adam Rokhsar from Harvestworks give a lecture about current and recent artistic projects at Harvestworks. They will also be available for individual Project Management consultations from workshop participants. Consultations will outline project resources, timelines, skill needs and financial estimates.

Hans Tammen, who draws from his extensive experience as a programmer for undertakers, today works with a bizarre collection of mechanical devices on his “endangered” guitars, and uses an interactive software of his own design to rework his sounds in realtime. His music has been described by “Signal To Noise” as “…a killer tour de force of post-everything guitar damage”, AllAboutJazz recommended him: “…one of improvised music’s most fascinating proponents.”

Video artist Adam Rokhsar, originally a therapist and behavioral science specialist for juvenile sex offenders, designs sound for interactive installations, teaches computer music and video programming, and is working on a Master’s thesis on machine learning algorithms. He is the lead singer for Brooklyn-based indie rock band The Recovery, a computer music performer, and live video artist who has worked with a variety of musicians.

The Cinema as a Concert Hall for the 21st Century – Alexis Bhagat

At the beginning of the 21st Century, “The Cinema” existed as a standardized built platform for the distribution of multi-channel audio compositions. With the exception of the New York Metropolitan Opera (with its Live HD Saturday Broadcasts), music and audio art presenters are not making use of this standardized platform. This lecture will address those barriers and ask the question of “Why movie theaters?” with a counter-question “Why art galleries?”. The history of sound art in the gallery space will be interwoven with a history of concert hall architecture and cinema sound, to bring us to the present day, and a shimmering awareness of the potential of the cinema as a place for profound listening experiences. Participants are invited to bring along samples of film soundtracks or of cinematic sound art compositions to share for listening and discussion.

Alexis Bhagat hosted this discussion at Khoj in Delhi (India) in 2007, SAT in Montreal and Red House Art Gallery in Syracuse in 2009, and at Soundlab in Buffalo.

How to Score in Radio – Lawrence Lanahan & Bruce Wallace

Scoring in a radio piece requires a deft touch. Great scoring can elevate a piece; bad scoring can ruin it. In this 90-minute session, producers Bruce Wallace and Lawrence Lanahan will discuss the uses and misuses of music as a device for audio story-telling. In the first part, they’ll play tape of conversations they had with Ira Glass, Jad Abumrad, Keith Talbot, and other pioneers of using music in radio stories, along with examples of these masters’ best work. In the second part, they’ll take a story they’ve gathered from a MEGAPOLIS participant and score it in real time — with input from the audience.

Lawrence Lanahan is a producer for Baltimore’s NPR member station, WYPR. His freelance work has appeared on Morning Edition, Studio 360, Weekend America, and Marketplace. You can check out his writing and music-making at lawrencelanahan.com.

Bruce Wallace is also a producer at WYPR. He’s done freelance work for PRI’s The World, and before coming to WYPR he interned for This American Life and then worked as an associate producer on TAL’s TV show. He doesn’t have a website because he’s lame.

Oversharing on the Radio – Benjamen Walker

Practical Cognitive Processes for the Audio Maker – Nick van der Kolk

In this workshop, we’ll explore various phenomena from the fields of psychoacoustics, cognitive psychology, and neuroscience to better manipulate, inform, and abuse our listeners.

Nick van der Kolk is co-founder and co-director of Megapolis. He lives in Chicago.

Sounds of Grief – Ian Nagoski

This is an hour-long listening session and lecture on the subject of vocal reactions to grief. Lamentation and songs of memorial are central within histories of ritual, theater and literature and may be important in understanding the evolutionary origins of music but appear on the entertainmental medium of sound recording infrequently. This presentation examines cross-cultural stylizations of vocal expressions in the wake of death on disc recordings from the period 1913-1978 and their relationships to ideas about the fundamental meanings of musical expression – privacy, empathy, community and the contagiousness of emotion through sound. The project itself is a response to the sudden and early deaths of two young musician friends and draws from research by musicologists including Gail Holst-Warhaft (notably her books Cue for Passion: Grief and Its Political Uses and Dangerous Voices: Women’s Laments and Greek Literature) and Elizabeth Tolbert (notably her study “Women Cry With Words: Symbolization of Affect in the Karelian Lament”).

Ian Nagoski is a music researcher and record producer. His radio show Fonotopia and record label Canary are both venues for the presentation of early 20th century recordings, particularly in languages other than English. His compilations of that material, Black Mirror and String of Pearls, have been praised by publications as diverse as AARP Magazine, Pitchfork Media, the Journal of the Society of Ethnomusicology and BoingBoing.net as well as musicians including DJ /rupture and members of the Ex, Beirut, Entrance Band and the Kronos Quartet. In the past year he has published articles on the French electronic musician Eliane Radigue, the availability of immigrant musics in Baltimore and the Turkish ballad of a zeybek chieftain.

The Sounds of Sex – Zachary Kent

This performance focuses on the fluctuations in the hormones of a female as she moves through her monthly cycle, and transcribes them into music. This includes recordings of selected months of music, how the information is tracked, and an explanation of the various patterns. Part biology lesson and part personal story, this performance examines the real taboos of sex, and talks about the things that weren’t covered in your Sex Education class.

Zachary Kent is a cohost of the podcast Dial A Stranger and a devoted husband to his wife Elizabeth. [so don't get any ideas, ladies. -ed.]

Third Sight-seeing: Aesthetic Adventures in Sensory Substitution – Myroslaw Bytz & Nick Heling

A presentation of an augmented reality technology, originally developed for the visually-impaired, which digitally reinterprets optical input into real-time, spatially dynamic sonic output. We will begin with a brief overview of existing implementations of these technologies which, while extremely promising as an adaptive sensory tool for the disabled, have not been widely explored for their potential to introduce new, synaesthetic perceptions of space into human experience. Next, we demonstrate a Java/Android phone application that performs these functions, along with our homebrewed (duct-taped!), wearable contraption: a personal mobile interface consisting of a head-mounted camera, a configured netbook running specialized software, and headphones.

This is followed by a few short-form films: a snippet of a BBC documentary featuring a real-life implementation by a visually-impaired person who has learned to “see through sound”; and a “synaesthetic travelogue,” documenting our “sound-seeing” or “sight-sounding” expeditions to scenic — and some not so scenic — locales that epitomize the Boston-Washington Megapolis, with a guided ear toward the distinctive qualities of each sonified visual space. Finally, we will play a selection from our ambient composition Third Sight: Gowanus, which utilized as its basis textures directly sonified from on-location video of the Gowanus canal in Brooklyn, and was featured in March as part of the gallery exhibition, Postcards from Gowanus. We welcome a Q&A session afterward, in which we will suggest and solicit ideas for further projects in audio-synthetic vision, including sonic photography.

Finally, we will offer sonic portraits of each attendee as mementos, in the form of ringtones or mp3s.

Nick Heling receives his MA in Media Studies, focusing on sound studies, from The New School, a week after Megapolis Festival. He will be presenting a paper on video game music at NYU’s Music and the Moving Image conference that weekend. He has contributed stories to WNYC’s Studio 360.

Myroslaw Bytz, also an MA Media Studies candidate at The New School, has produced all flavors of electronic music and audio experimentations for over a decade, under various pseudonyms. His latest track, Amfuem, was adapted into an independent film, which garnered First Prize for Sound at the 2010 Jaipur Film Festival.

Three Algorithms: Strange Connections Between Logic, Disorientation, and Experimental Music- John Berndt

A lecture with performed musical examples by John Berndt, covering aspects of his unique researches into the relationship between unusual formal structures and the phenomenology of time and quantification. The three algorithms in question each involve feedback that is tuned through “human perception” to create unusual instabilities and sustained qualities. These include “Shadow,” a sort of echo-within a sound; Pi Waves that sound pitched but lack a fundamental frequency; and “Relabi,” a new form of structure based on a paradoxical sense of structure unfolding in time, always slipping an implied pulse.

Baltimore’s John Berndt is a eclectic, intense cultural force. Best known to the public as a prolific musician, composer and improviser and as a key organizer in the scene around the international High Zero festival and Red Room, Berndt’s work from the very beginning also involved the creation of coherent novelties in a broader range of media, including personal behavior, film, visual art, text, installation and a variety of non-musical performance genres. Driven by his unique philosophy and collaborations, his panoramic sensibility is characterized by a dizzying non-reductionism and careful pheonominolgical research in the context of philosophical radicalism. He often attempts to go beyond the limits of rationalism without defaulting to “the humanities” side of the civilization’s world-outlook. Today, Berndt is busy with composing music for his groups The Multiphonic Choir abnd Geodesic Gnome, directing an orchestra project Second Nature, writing philosophy, and developing the theory and practice of Relabi dance music, muisc built on a “pulse-which-is-not-a-pulse.”

Tour of Neil Feather’s Studio

Small groups will squeeze into Neil Feather’s crowded and fantastic studio and experience numerous experimental musical instruments. Among the instruments will be the Nondo, the Contraption, Vibrowheels, Former Guitars, the Futura Ultra-Retro and many more.

Sound mechanic Neil Feather has been creating radical and unusual musical instruments since 1970 and is increasingly known outside of Baltimore as one of the most original musical thinkers of his day. His instruments each embody uniquely clever acoustic and engineering principles, and are visually arresting. The music he plays on the instruments is equally original, embodying new principles and resulting in a nearly alien idiom of music. A founding member of THUS and THE OFFICIAL PROJECT, as well as the leader of AEROTRAIN, he has a long history of collaborative projects and solo concerts, and he teaches a sound sculpture course at the Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore MD.

SUNDAY EVENING

2640_MOVE_MUSIC – Timothy Nohe & many many more

Choreographers, musicians, and artists are responding “in the round” to the unique features and acoustics of the 110 year-old church located in Baltimore’s Charles Village. The dancers will work with live video cameras and projection, body extensions, light environments, and extended techniques in modern and tap movement. The musicians will employ architectural elements within the church, extended vocal techniques, laptops, wine glasses, saxophone, ebow guitar, wavetable synthesis, zither, bowed percussion, toys, a voice actor, and inventions.

Renée Brozic Barger has been performing, teaching and making dances in the Baltimore/DC Metro Area for over twelve years. She is a founding director of movement/addiction, a dance-based multi-media performance company, and is currently the coordinator of the dance program at Howard Community College in addition to serving as Director of HCC’s Arts Collective Dance Company.

Using the cello, voice and analog electronics, Audrey Chen’s work delves deeply into her own version of narrative and non-linear storytelling. A large component of her music is improvised and her approach to this is extremely personal and visceral. Her playing explores the combination and layering of a homemade analog synth, preparations and traditional and extended techniques in both the voice and cello. She works to join these elements into a singular ecstatic personal language.

Tiffany DeFoe is a saxophonist and stone-age giantess. Current projects include the Multiphonic Choir, The Bellevederes, Lafayette Gilchrist and the New Volcanoes, Gunwife Gone, the Baltimore Afrobeat Society, a community arts and activism center called 2640, and the collectively owned and operated bookstore Red Emma’s.

Meghan Flanigan is a dancer, improviser and creator of movement based work. She has recently returned to her native Baltimore after living in Bogotá, London, New York and Providence. Her work is inspired by the people and places that surround her and has been developed in theaters, site-specific locations, galleries and sometimes only in her imagination. She is currently pursuing a MFA in Imaging and Digital Arts at UMBC.

Carol Hess is known for her groundbreaking work focusing on the interaction between dance and video. Born in New York City, she trained as a dancer and performed with Hannah Kahn and Dancers, The Rondo Dance Theater, and DANCES/Janet Soares, and is co-director of the award-winning Baltimore Dance Project. The book Dancing describes her as a “new wave tap dancer.”

Francesca Jandasek, born in Africa and of Czech descent, has worked with several companies in the Washington DC area, including Propaganda Dance Theater, CityDance Ensemble, Artefacts Dance, BosmaDance, Santi Budaya (Indonesian Dance) and Deviated Theater and has performed and taught nationally and internationally. She received a choreographic fellowship from the Kennedy Center as part of the Millennium Stage Local Dance Commissioning Project 2006 and she choreographed and composed music for the full evening length work, “Ellesmere”.

Clarinda Mac Low’s solo work and collaborative group extravaganzas have appeared at P.S. 122, St. Mark’s Church, Movement Research at the Judson Church, the Kitchen, and many other places and spaces around New York City (including a century-old ferryboat and the Queens Botanical Garden) and elsewhere in the world, including a park in Siberia. She is Co-Director of Culture Push, a cross-disciplinary organization encouraging hands-on participation and strong hybrid ideas.

Luca Marini is a German/Italian drummer currently based in New York City who currently performs with The Little (with Pär Lammers, Santiago Botero, Noe Escola), Tatune (Guillaume Heurtebize, Santiago Botero), Herbert Eckardt, Blin (duo with dutch guitar player Jasper Stadhouders) and Van der Weide/Fariello/Marini trio. He performed and toured in Europe and North America playing improvised music, jazz, rock and electronic music. http://www.

Timothy Nohe is an artist and educator engaging traditional and electronic media in public life and public places. Nohe has exhibited and performed his work in a range of national and international venues, from North America to Europe and Australia. Nohe was the recipient of a 2006 Fulbright Senior Scholar Award from the Australian – American Fulbright Commission. His professional affiliations include the Electronic Music Foundation and the Society of Electro-Acoustic Music in the United States.

Catherine Pancake is a filmmaker, artist, and organizer currently living in Baltimore. In Fall 2010, she will enter the School of the Art Institute of Chicago to pursue an MFA in Film/Video/New Media. Her award-winning films have been screened and broadcast internationally including the Museum of Modern Art, Washington Project for the Arts, and will be featured in Toronto at the InsideOut Festival in May 2010. Her experimental music has been presented at the Shanghai Conservatory ROC, International House Japan, Bard College, Princeton University and a wide range of experimental music venues.

Nicole Shiflet is a Wisonsin-born, Georgia-raised multimedia visual artist living in Baltimore. Though no scientist herself, much of her work references a variety of scientific phenomena. She received her MFA in Imaging and Digital Arts from UMBC in 2006 and her BFA in Painting from the University of Georgia in 1998. Her work ranges from drawing and painting to 2D animation and sculptural sound objects.

Stephanie Yezek is a dancer and choreographer, working with the likes of Dakshina/Daniel Phoenix Singh Dance Company, DeviatedTheatre, Gesel Mason Performance Projects and the award-winning BosmaDance, and David Dorfman. As co-founder of BARE, a contemporary dance collaboration created in 2008 with Francesca Jandasek and Leah Wrobel, Stephanie seeks to incorporate diverse creative visions in the works she creates to produce not a single voice, but a harmony of voices atop a physical, expressive movement vocabulary.